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IAGC "QUESTION OF THE MONTH" Blog Posts 

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  • 03/18/2021 3:12 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)


    Why Do Advanced Learners Grapple With Underachievement and What Can We Do About It?  

    -Patricia Steinmeyer

    SUBSCRIBE TO IAGC QUESTION OF THE MONTH

    Often we think of gifted and advanced learners as those who are successful in school, embrace learning opportunities, and are highly motivated. However, this is not always the case. Some highly capable students do not excel in school and may even resist learning. For parents and educators of children with exceptional abilities and potential, it can be heartbreaking and frustrating when a child's performance in school does not match his or her capabilities. 

    Because of the diversity of talents and strengths exhibited by individuals, there is no set definition for underachieving gifted and talented learners. However, it is generally understood that underachievement refers to a difference between expected achievement and ability (Reis, 2000).It is also difficult to characterize underachievers because individuals may underachieve in certain areas and not others.

    Underachievement can manifest itself in a lack of motivation, which may be reflected in a variety of behaviors such as apparent laziness, defiance, disengagement, procrastination, and/or passive aggressiveness (Whitney & Hirsch, 2007, pp. 37-38). 

    There are also different types of underachievers. Richard Cash, Ed. D. identifies two types of underachievers, “nonproducers” who perform well on tests, but do not complete daily assignments and homework, and “selective producers” who know that they are capable, but only complete work that they are interested in doing (Cash 2017). 

    As a teacher, I observed that underachievement on the part of advanced learners was sometimes driven by a lack of appropriate challenge or interest in the class work. This is not surprising because advanced learners may begin the school year having mastered 40-50 percent of the material (Heacox & Cash, p. 139). Also, many gifted and advanced learners have intense interests that they do not have the opportunity to explore in school due to inflexibility in the curriculum and/or lack of differentiation. 

    In addition to the lack of appropriate challenge and/or engaging learning experiences, other potential factors that may contribute to underachievement include the following:

    • Family struggles/life changes
    • Perfectionism
    • Lack of culturally responsive curriculum and instruction that creates a sense of relevance and belonging for students from diverse backgrounds and cultures
    • Peer influences
    • Fixed mindset (as opposed to a growth mindset that accepts mistakes and struggle as a part of learning, resulting in resilience, perseverance and grit)
    • A sense of lack of control over circumstances
    • Negative perceptions of one’s own abilities/poor self-concept
    • Unclear Expectations
    • Test anxiety
    • A sense that work is irrelevant/unimportant for achieving personal goals
    • Lack of clear and meaningful feedback
    • (For perceived underachievement) Undiagnosed learning disability, illness, or health concern

    As human beings, all of us underachieve at times. But what can parents do when they observe a pattern or consistent underachievement? Here are a few suggestions:

    Check in with the child’s teacher and extracurricular coaches/instructors.

    • Ask teachers to share their observations and perspectives with respect to any changes in your child’s attitudes or performance. This can help you to get a complete picture of your child’s daily experience.
    • If you speak with teachers in classes/activities in which your child is motivated and successful, ask about any strategies or suggestions they may have that may help to motivate your child.
    • Find out whether the curriculum relevant to your child’s experience and inclusive of your child through its acknowledgement of his/her culture and heritage. 
    • Gain awareness of the type of feedback your child receives in school. Positive, specific feedback from the teacher can be highly motivating when it acknowledges individual effort, provides clear, constructive suggestions for improvement, and underscores the meaningfulness of the assignment. Help your child to review and reflect on this feedback when provided.
    • Ask about whether there are opportunities for choice when projects are assigned. Having choice may provide a sense of autonomy that can increase motivation.
    • Ask your child’s teacher for any suggestions about what you can do as a parent to support your child’s continued learning and growth in the classroom.

    Check in with your child's physician to rule out potential health concerns.

    • Sometimes a child's underachievement, especially when there is a change in behavior, may reflect an underlying physical or emotional health issue. 

    Talk with your child. Some helpful questions to start a conversation may be:

    • How are things going in school? What do you think is going well? In what classes/subjects are you struggling?
    • Are there things that your teacher, parent, and/or you can do to help?
    • How do you feel about school days? When are you feeling the best about school and your work?
    • If you could create the most interesting assignment or learning experience for yourself, what would it be?
    • What are your goals for yourself and/or what would you like to do when you grow up? How do you think school will help you with your goals?
    • What school subjects and classes interest you the most? Why? What about those classes/subjects that do not interest you? How could they be improved? Is there anything you think you could do differently to help yourself in those subjects?

    Encourage or support your child’s passions and interests if these interests are physically and emotionally healthy and align with your values. 

    • Your child’s sense of excitement and curiosity can positively impact a sense of joy in learning, a positive self-concept, a sense of control, and self-efficacy. 
    • Participating in activities with peers and/or mentors that have similar interests may inspire and/or motivate your child.

    Accept that your child may have unique strengths and talents in some areas but not others.

    • Often children excel in some areas, but not in others. Educators and parents should maintain high expectations for children and encourage children to put forth effort and embrace challenges. However, it is also important to keep expectations realistic.

    Help your child to set realistic and measurable short term and long term goals.

    • Set goals that are within your child’s control such as “I will practice 5 math problems per day,” or “I will write a paragraph in my journal every Thursday.” Once your child gains confidence by fulfilling short term goals, extend goals gradually.
    • Help your child to be accountable by following up routinely, reflecting on progress, and celebrating incremental progress.
    • For more information on goal setting, review theIAGC January 2021 Question of the Month Blog: How Can I Help My Advanced Learner Set and Achieve Goals?

    Always let your child know that they are loved and valued for who they are, not what they achieve.

    As engaged, informed, and positive advocates, parents can provide invaluable support for reversing underachievement among advanced learners. Although the road may be challenging, we can help our children overcome this struggle through respectful listening, creativity, understanding and love.

    JOIN IAGC TODAY!

    Sources:

    • Cash, R. Understanding Underachievement in Gifted Learners. Free Spirit Publishing Blog. August 17, 2017. https://freespiritpublishingblog.com/2017/08/17/understanding-underachievement-in-gifted-learners/
    • Heacox, D. (2020).Differentiation for gifted learners: Going beyond the basics. Minneapolis, MN: Free Spirit Publishing.
    • Reis, S. M., & McCoach, D. B. (2000). The underachievement of gifted students: What do we know and where do we go?Gifted Child Quarterly,44(3), 152-170. Retrieved from:https://www.davidsongifted.org/search-database/entry/a10094
    • Whitney, C. S., & Hirsch, G. (2007).A Love for Learning: Motivation and the Gifted Child. Great Potential Press, pp. 37-38.

    Additional Resources:

    • Cash, R. Understanding Underachievement in Gifted Learners. Free Spirit Publishing Blog. August 17, 2017. https://freespiritpublishingblog.com/2017/08/17/understanding-underachievement-in-gifted-learners/
    • Delisle, J. R. (2018). Doing poorly on purpose: Strategies to reverse underachievement and respect student dignity. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.
    • Whitney, C. S., & Hirsch, G. (2007). A Love for Learning: Motivation and the Gifted Child. Great Potential Press
    • NAGC Webpage - Underachievement(Includes an additional list of resources.)
    • Summer Institute for the Gifted: Underachievement in Gifted Students: Reversal is Possible.

    EXPLORE THE IAGC WEBSITE




  • 02/22/2021 6:16 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Should My Child Skip a Grade in School?

    When a child seems to have already mastered curriculum material in mathematics and/or language arts, parents and educators may wonder if that child would feel happier and appropriately challenged in a more advanced grade level. At the same time, we may hesitate to explore grade skipping, otherwise known as grade level acceleration, for reasons such as the following:

    • What if my child misses her friends or has difficulty meeting new friends?

    • What if the more advanced grade level is too hard? 

    • What if my child is physically less mature than other children; will he/she be able to play sports?

    • How will my child feel if she enters middle school/high-school/college early? Will he/she be emotionally ready?

    There are many misconceptions surrounding the potential negative impacts of grade level acceleration including that it has negative consequences for children academically. On the contrary, an abundance of research shows that when appropriately implemented, acceleration has positive academic and social outcomes for children with advanced learning needs. A summary of this research can be found in A Nation Empowered: Evidence Trumps the Excuses Holding Back America’s Brightest Students (2015) edited by Susan G. Assouline, Nicholas Colangelo, Joyce VanTassel-Baska, and Ann Lupkowski-Shoplik. This resource can be downloaded at no charge from the Acceleration Institute. 

    Despite its potential advantages, grade level acceleration is not the most appropriate option for every child with advanced learning needs. A variety of factors such as academic need, social-emotional readiness, age and grade of siblings, and program alternatives, should be considered when deciding whether grade level acceleration is the best option. One tool often used by professional educators and administrators, theIowa Acceleration Scale, takes a variety of factors into account to provide guidance about whether accelerated placement is appropriate for meeting a child’s needs.

    For some children who show readiness, the easiest time to accelerate can be in the early grades, such as when a child is ready to enter Kindergarten or First Grade. For more information about early entrance as well as other options to meet the needs of young learners, please join the Illinois Association for Gifted Children a special virtual expert panel discussion on Tuesday, April 13, 2021, from 7:00 PM - 8:15 PM: Time for Elementary School: What Parents Need to Know About Early Entrance to Kindergarten/First Grade, Acceleration, and Advanced Learning.

    Finally, although “acceleration” is often associated with “grade skipping,” there are several different kinds of acceleration that support advanced learning needs, but do not require skipping a grade. Individual subject acceleration, independent studies, curriculum compacting within the grade level classroom, or distance learning courses. A Nation Empowered describes twenty different types of acceleration.

    -Patricia Steinmeyer, Executive Director, IAGC

    For more information:

    Academic Acceleration: Information for Parents, Illinois Association for Gifted Children website. 


  • 01/25/2021 8:42 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    How Can I Help My Advanced Learner Set and Achieve Goals?

    With January “New Year’s Resolutions,” we set goals for the coming year. As we do so, we think about what relationships and personal characteristics that we would like to improve, make plans for meeting challenges, and develop long and short term objectives for self-improvement. Making and keeping resolutions is a great way to steer ourselves toward a productive year. 

    One valuable “new year’s resolution” that educators and parents should consider is to transfer this power of “goal setting” to our children. All children, including advanced learners, face challenges in school and in life, so they need tools to forge ahead and overcome obstacles. One way to provide direction for success and to empower our children is to teach them how to set goals for themselves. Here are five tips for parents to help your child to set and achieve goals in school this year:

    1). Help your child to reflect and take ownership of his or her goals.

    It may be easy for teachers and parents to see where children are struggling in school and could benefit from goal setting. It is often clear to adults to recognize when children need to focus on areas such as organization, building friendships, or mastering certain academic subject areas. Yet, however we may be tempted, we must be careful not to set goals for our children, but with our children. 

    Take time to reflect with your child about the status quo, and help your child to recognize what goals may be appropriate, understand why they are important, and care about their goals. The following questions may help:

    • What are some areas in school that are going well? Why do you think they are going well?
    • What is not going so well that you might want to improve?
    • What kinds of help might you need to make things better?
    • What are one or two things you think you might be able to do to make things better?

    Sometimes, children can identify where they are struggling, but may not know what to do. At that point, brainstorming a list of potential solutions (no matter how far-fetched), is a great way to start. Then, you can discuss this list with your child and choose a couple practical ideas. If strategies are still not available, you can look for resources together or consult with your child’s teacher to help gain some ideas. 

    2). Start small.

    Even with the best intentions and for experienced goal-setters, it can be difficult to stick with long-range goals. In fact, research shows that most people give up their New Year’s resolutions by February. Try setting a goal for the day, such as learning three vocabulary words, practicing an instrument for 15 minutes, or remembering one’s backpack without a reminder. Then, after short term successes are reached, move to longer time frames and larger goals.

    3). Help your child set goals that are within your child’s control.

    Your child may be tempted to set goals such as “Getting an A” in mathematics or “being captain of the soccer team.” While these may be well-deserved, and even likely results of hard work, such goals are often not immediately within your child’s control. 

    For children, especially those who are new to goal setting, try focusing on learning or mastery goals such as: “I will remember to turn in my homework”; or “I will ask the teacher when I have a question,” or “I will check my work to and mark where I explain each step of my reasoning before I turn it in,” or “I will practice my soccer drills for 15-minutes per day.” These types of goals are measurable, and progress can be easily tracked and celebrated.

    4). Set a time to revisit goals.

    As a teacher, one of my favorite “goal setting” forms for elementary students read as follows:

    My goal: ___________________

    What my parent can do to help me reach my goal: __________

    What my teacher can do to help me reach my goal: ________________

    What I can do to help myself reach my goal: ___________________

    My parent/teacher will check in with me on: ________________

    When we will meet again to discuss my progress: __________________

    This form clearly states the responsibilities of all parties who have impact on success. Moreover, it set a time when goals will be reviewed. Setting a time to review is very important for a few reasons:

    • It maintains accountability for all parties to prevent goals from being abandoned.
    • It helps to prevent a sense of “nagging” because parents have set times to focus on the issue with children and children recognize at the outset that they will be accountable to discuss their progress at given time intervals.
    • It allows for reflection, adjustments and extra support/independence to be given as the child works toward his/her goal.

    5). Celebrate incremental success.

    It takes time to develop new habits, and sometimes goal mastery does not happen right away. Children may have a day when goals are not met, and/or when set-backs occur. Help keep your child motivated by celebrating incremental progress and success. Recognize when children make an independent effort to achieve their goals or make partial progress. 

    When we empower children to set their own, meaningful and realistic goals, we engage them as learners and help support skills that can help bring them success in the coming year. More importantly, it will provide them with an essential skill for seeing through their own resolutions and pursuing their dreams throughout their lifetimes.

    -Patricia Steinmeyer, Executive Director, IAGC


    For more information on goal setting, check out the following articles and resources:

    Cash, R.M. (January 4, 2018). Smart Goals for Gifted Children. Free Spirit Publishing Blog.

    Morin, A. (September 17, 2020). How to Set Goals for Your Child This School Year. VeryWell Family. 

    Siegle, D. and McCoach, B. Promoting a positive achievement attitude with gifted and talented students. Excerpted from: The social and emotional development of gifted children: What do we know?, pp. 6-7, 29-30. Prufrock Press. (retrieved from Davidson Institute Database)



  • 12/15/2020 7:20 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)


    The pandemic has brought with it many challenges for families, and the end of 2020 brings hope for a better year ahead and a vaccine. In the meantime, with restaurant closings and social distancing, many families are likely to find themselves spending the holidays at home. As we adjust our holiday traditions to spend time together with our immediate families, there are some positive implications-- such as having the time to spend family dinner hour together.

    Unfortunately, economic and time barriers present challenges for many families that make having dinner together something that cannot be taken for granted. In fact, since 2010, a non-profit initiative, the Family Dinner Project has shared resources and information to support family dinner hours. This is because research shows that having family dinners together has immense benefits for children including the following:

    • Better academic performance

    • Higher self-esteem

    • Greater sense of resilience

    • Lower risk of substance abuse

    • Lower risk of teen pregnancy

    • Lower risk of depression

    • Lower likelihood of developing eating disorders

    • Lower rates of obesity

    Above list quoted from  “Benefits of Family Dinners,” Family Dinner Project website. 

    For parents and families of advanced learners, family dinner conversation provides an opportunity to support the development of positive psychosocial skills because it enables families to reflect together on daily goals, challenges, and successes. 

    In IAGC’s July 2020 and August 2020 “Question of the Month” blog posts, Dr. Olszewski-Kubilius, the director of the Center for Talent Development at Northwestern University and a professor in the School of Education and Social Policy, suggests ten psychosocial skills that support success at high levels of achievement. Among the ten skills she highlights are grit, self-control, finding meaningfulness in learning, developing appropriate attitudes toward work and ability, resilience, optimism, and the ability to deal with stress and control anxiety. Many of these dispositions and skills can be modeled and discussed through our daily conversations at the dinner table. Consider the following common simple conversations that may arise when families share their “daily happenings'':

    • Today I made a mistake at school/work, but I learned ______, and I have a few ideas for fixing it tomorrow. (grit, optimism)

    • The lasagne I made today is not perfect because I did not add enough spice, but it tastes pretty good. It’s fun to try a new recipe. (finding meaningfulness in learning)

    • It sounds like you are struggling with your writing assignment this week. It can take time to develop writing skills. What questions do you think you could ask your teacher that might help? (developing appropriate attitudes toward work and ability)

    • I was really upset that I made a mistake in my presentation today, but I took a few deep breaths, asked for a moment to consult my notes, and managed as best I could.What else could I have done to stay calm “in the moment?” (self-control)

    • I understand that you are worried that you will not make the team. Would you like to talk about it? (deal with stress; control anxiety; resilience)

    • You worked very hard in school this week. You must be proud. What makes you the happiest about your accomplishment? (finding meaningfulness in learning; developing appropriate attitudes toward work and ability)

    • I have so many things to do to get ready for the holidays. I made a list so that I could prioritize. Can any of you help me with ideas for these two gifts? (dealing with stress)

    • I have a really funny story from today that made me laugh...

    By listening to our children, encouraging them to reflect, and modeling by sharing our own reflections, parents can support positive dispositions and attitudes toward learning that last a lifetime. 

    And as we embrace additional time to linger at family dinners, laugh, share what is on our minds, brainstorm solutions, and explore different perspectives, we may resolve that this nutritious “food for thought” remains on the menu throughout 2021.


    -Patricia Steinmeyer

    Executive Director, IAGC


    See Anderson, J. (April, 1, 2020). “Harvard EdCast: The Benefit of Family Mealtime - Anne Fishel, executive director of the Family Dinner Project, helps families find fun, creative, and easy ways to make meals a reality.”Harvard Graduate School of Education News & Events. https://www.gse.harvard.edu/news/20/04/harvard-edcast-benefit-family-mealtime

  • 11/19/2020 11:06 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    How Can I Encourage My Child to Be Creative?

    Although emphasis is often placed on academic achievement for advanced learners, it is crucial that parents and educators recognize and nurture creativity in our children.

    Last week, the National Association for Gifted Children’s (“NAGC”)  67th National Convention Reimagined!featured presenters who shared some valuable insights about nurturing creativity. Scott Ross, a pioneer in digital media and Founder, Chairman, and CEO of Digital Domain, Inc., presented the opening Keynote, “Will the Real Creative Person Please Stand Up?” During his talk, he shared his career experiences and how learning to help and collaborate with talented people with differing skills and personalities challenged his own stereotypes of creativity. He emphasized the importance of teaching children with gifts and talents how to interact and share their ideas with others. Also, he pointed out that creativity is not a special gift endowed on a lucky few, but a characteristic that can be encouraged and nurtured.

    At another NAGC Conference session, “Imagination + Engineering: Learning to Think Like an Imagineer,” Brian Housand and Angela M. Housand discussed strategies used by Disney “Imagineers” to create the “magic” that visitors experience in Disney World. The Housands suggested applying Sandra Kaplan’s “Think Like a Disciplinarian” approach to encourage children to view activities as professionals do in the field. For young “imagineers,” this means “thinking inside the box” (rather than “outside the box”) just as professional Disney imagineers do when they design rides in limited spaces. Within constraints, children are encouraged to generate many ideas -- even those that are “impossible,” and build upon the creative ideas of others. During this process, children are assigned roles of “the dreamer,” “the realist,” and “the spoiler.” “Dreamers” can generate ideas safely and with exuberance because the challenges to these ideas are reserved for the “realists” and the “spoilers.” These roles help to prevent children with a propensity toward self-judgment from evaluating and dismissing creative solutions before giving them a chance to develop. Just imagine how a child’s new and inventive ideas can flow when they are not shut down as they emerge! 

    The NAGC TIP Sheet, “Nurturing Creativity,” provides several practical ways that parents and educators can encourage children to be creative (link included below), and an excerpt from this TIP sheet includes the following suggestions:

    • Build your home environment around your family's interests and strengths. Provide stimulating work spaces, supplies, displays, and tools. Include arts materials as well as books, prints, recordings, instruments, and children’s biographies. 

    • Allow your child to see you make mistakes, try a different approach, and take risks. Show your curiosity and joy; share your humor. 

    • Do projects with your children that engage their whole selves: touching, feeling, imagining, listening, sensing, composing, combining, writing, improvising, and inventing. 

    • Create open time in your child’s day for creative exploration. Expose your child to as many different areas/fields as possible. 

    • Include the natural world as a source for exploration and learning―nature integrates all the senses.

    As parents and educators, it can be a challenge to keep open time in a child’s daily schedule for play and exploration. However, during these days of remote learning, we may find more opportunity for children to engage in their individual, creative pursuits. With nurturing, this “found time” for ideas, inventions, and new discoveries can bring your child joy and become an important part of every day for years to come.

    -Patricia Steinmeyer, Executive Director, IAGC

    Resources:

    Dr. Brian Housand’s Blog: Want to Be More Creative? Try Thinking Like a Kid

    Imagineering in a Box - Khan Academy

    NAGC TIP Sheet Nurturing Creativity

    Davidson Institute: Parenting the Creative Child

    NAGC Webpage: Nurturing Creativity




  • 10/20/2020 11:25 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)


    Advanced readers are often avid readers, quickly digesting books in the children’s section that are available in the classroom, home, and local libraries. But it can be tricky to find new avenues to expand and enrich the reading repertoire for young, advanced readers. For example, books that have a high reading level may also include mature themes that are not “age appropriate” for some children. Or, children with strong interests in one area may not be motivated to expand their reading selections beyond their favorite texts. 

    Thankfully, to support your advanced reader, “tricks” are unnecessary. However, here are a few “treats” that may be helpful:

    • Search lists of award-winning texts. 

    • Explore diverse cultures and authors. The following links offer several text suggestions to deepen your child's understanding:

    • Make time for family read-alouds. Do you have a challenging text that you feel your child would enjoy, but it is still beyond his or her independent reading level? Family read-alouds that feature more challenging texts can be a great way to spend time together and introduce new books.

    • Empower your child.Consider asking your child to take the lead and choose the book the parent or family member will read during shared independent reading time. Once parents have had a chance to enjoy and discuss a child’s favorite books, maybe the child will decide that the parent can have a turn to choose next time!

    • Enliven book discussion. Invite your child to choose a few book discussion questions using SEM-R Bookmarks found on the University of Connecticut Renzulli Center for Creativity, Gifted Education, and Talent Development Website

    • Consult with your local library’s youth services specialist. Do not miss the opportunity to tap in to expertise on children’s literature. Your library’s youth services specialist may have several suggestions for reading selections that will appeal to your child’s interests, age group, and reading level.

    • Embark upon a Dewey Decimal System treasure hunt. In public libraries, books are subdivided by groupings. Examples of main groupings include 000–099, general works; 100–199, philosophy and psychology; 200–299, religion; 300–399, social sciences; 400–499, language; and 500–599, natural sciences and mathematics.These groups are further broken down into subcategories. Challenge your child to find the “Dewey Decimal System” numbers for a few areas of interest and go “treasure hunting” in a few different libraries to find books shelved under your child’s favorite categories. This can be a mind-opening adventure to engage your child with reading and information gathering.

    • Introduce texts of varying genres. Although your child may love fiction or history and read at advanced levels in those areas, it is important to provide exposure to a variety of genres. Encourage your child to try poetry, non-fiction, graphic novels, how-to books, autobiographies and short stories. 

      • Looking for non-fiction for a young reader? Here are a few series to explore--some with a Halloween flair!: 

        • Terry Deary, Horrible Histories

        • Nick Arnold, Horrible Science 

        • Eyewitness Books

        • Usborne Beginners History

        • National Geographic for Kids

    • Note Your Child’s Favorite Authors. There may be several other books by these authors that your child might enjoy. 

    • Subscribe to a children’s online or paper magazine related to your child’s interest. Digital magazines are often available for free from your public library. Your child may enjoy short articles on topics of interest that increase domain-specific vocabulary and are fun to share and discuss with others.

    • Let Reading Be a Joy. 

      • Keep reading recreational and beyond reading for work, school,and to keep up on current events. 

      • While introducing new texts, don’t worry if your child still returns to re-reading “old favorites.” 

    Look beyond the value of reading for “challenge.” Reading is, indeed, a lifelong  “treat,” that we hope will provide years of pleasure, comfort, and inspiration for your child!

    -The IAGC Education Committee

    Contributors: Patsy Steinmeyer, Michele Kane, Susan Corwith, Laura Beltchenko, and Beth Dirkes

    SAVE THE DATE:  Education Consultant, Laura Beltchenko, will present an IAGC virtual parent workshop on Tuesday, December 8, 2020 for parents, Beyond the Book List: Nurturing Readers Who Assimilate and Ponder What They Read 



  • 09/22/2020 3:12 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    As parents, we evolve as problem-solvers. When our children are hungry, we feed them. When they fall down, we help them up, dry the tears, and reach for the band-aids. So when we see our grade school children become upset about difficulties in the classroom--perhaps at the kitchen table as they attend school online - our first instinct may be to reach for our laptop, send an email to the teacher, and make the problem go away.

    It is essential for parents of high-ability students to communicate with teachers and advocate for their children.  However, sometimes going a step further to support our children means taking a thoughtful step back. Buried beneath those sometimes frustrating daily school challenges are rich opportunities for parents to help to teach their children to become articulate, respectful, and effective self-advocates. 

    Especially during times of remote learning, these opportunities may be right before our eyes — when it is difficult to hear the classroom conversation over the internet, when our child whips the morning’s assignments and does not know what to do next, or when the homework instructions are unclear —

    So next time that you are inclined to pick up the phone and problem-solve for your child, try the following three steps instead:

    1. Discuss the issue thoughtfully with your child. For instance, if your child is frustrated with the sound quality of the remote lesson, what has he or she done to address the problem?  Is she managing her time correctly at home and using class time wisely?  If your child feels that assignments are insufficiently challenging, are there any aspects of the lessons that she finds interesting, or topics that she would prefer to study?  Has your child taken advantage of any extra credit or enrichment opportunities in the classroom?  Is she doing her best work, or rushing through to get the job done? 

    2. Brainstorm some options for “problem-solving.”  Have your child create a list of several potential solutions to solve the problem. Then, evaluate each potential solution with your child. How would solving the problem this way make you feel? How would others' feelings be impacted? What other points of view might there be about this situation? What would be the likely result of this potential solution? What practical implications may be involved?  If your child does not have enough information to propose a solution, discuss what questions might be helpful to ask the teacher or others involved in the situation.

    3. Consider ways to support your child with handling the matter independently. For example, if your child has a simple question for the teacher, help your child to compose a short e-mail or “rehearse” how to respectfully bring the matter up with his or her teacher via Zoom or during in-school time. Your child may discover that sending a respectful email is all that is needed to clarify homework expectations or to alert the teacher of an incorrectly answered grade. Or, your child may experience how a well-timed request for extra help or enrichment can yield a desirable result.

    Of course, some school-related concerns are best resolved with more direct parental involvement. But many day-to-day issues also provide wonderful opportunities for students to take charge of their own educational experience and learning. 

    Patricia Steinmeyer, Executive Director, IAGC

    Upcoming IAGC Virtual Workshop -Supporting Self-Advocacy for Children with Gifts and Talents - Featured Presenter: Deb DouglasFor a more comprehensive understanding of the benefits and power of self-advocacy for gifted children and for practical strategies to help them take ownership their education, please attend the IAGC “Supporting Self-Advocacy for Children with Gifts and Talents” virtual workshop on Saturday, October 24, 2020 from 9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. Our featured presenter will be Deb Douglas, author of The Power of Self-Advocacy for Gifted Learners: Teaching the Four Essential Steps to Success (Grades 5–12), Free Spirit Publishing, 2018.

  • 08/27/2020 2:44 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)


    Dr. Paula Olszewski-Kubilius, Director of the Center for Talent Development at Northwestern University, suggests ten important skills for parent to cultivate in their children with gifts and talents.  Five of these skills were shared in our July 2020 blog, "Top Ten Skills to Cultivate in Your Gifted Child - Part I." This month, Part II includes 5 more characteristics  that are important for parents who wish to support their gifted children.

    Top Ten Skills to Cultivate in Your Gifted Child - Part II

    Paula Olszewski-Kubilius

    I am often asked by parents what are the most important “things” to do for a gifted  child? Over the years, I have developed this list of characteristics that I have come to believe are some of the most important ones for parents to cultivate so as to help gifted children realize their dreams (notice I said “their dreams” and not their parents’). My list is based on the research literature in the field and my own experience as an administrator of gifted programs and as a parent.

    Grit. This is a concept that Angela Duckworth, a psychologist from the University of Pennsylvania, has developed and promoted. She defines it as “perseverance and passion for long term goals” (p. 1087). Grit involves working assiduously in a talent domain over time, including maintaining effort despite failures, plateaus, and setbacks. Grit may emerge early in a young aspiring musician or artist or develop later as a high school student commits to the study of medicine or political science. How does one develop or cultivate grit? While research has not specifically focused on this, finding one’s passions seems to be key, which takes time and deliberate searching. Parents can help by exposing children to a wide range of fields and topics of study through informal (e.g. trips to museums) and formal learning experiences (e.g. enrichment courses). We do this a lot with young children but it is important to also help older children investigate fields and careers to find their passions. Also, helping students understand that people who make creative contributions to society were “in it for the long haul” and that creative breakthroughs do not come out of the blue without commitment and hard work over extended periods of time, is also crucial. Children can begin to get a picture of this by reading about the lives of eminent individuals and seeing that there were ups and downs, great triumphs and some failures along the way—and that the development of their abilities and talents is a lifelong journey.

    Self-control. This is another characteristic that Duckworth talks about. She defines it as the regulation of behavior, attention and emotion to meet personal goals and standards. Self-control is what enables a student to stay focused on a day-to-day basis on meeting the many smaller goals that are involved in reaching big life goals. Self-control is involved in working consistently to get good grades in a course even if it is not that interesting and choosing to do homework instead of socializing with friends, even though the latter is much more fun. It boils down to a willingness to do what it takes to “get the job done” even if the activity (e.g. practice) is not always that enjoyable. Self-control involves being able to delay immediate gratification so as to remain focused on a larger goal. This is an important skill to model and teach your child. There are many things in life that we all do that are a “means to an end” --- a necessary step on the path towards more autonomous and enjoyable activities. Too many gifted children miss out on challenging and engaging opportunities because they are unwilling to work to get the grades that are needed to qualify or be selected for them. Like it or not, teachers will often choose students who are willing to work hard and make the most out of a special class or opportunity rather than a child who is very bright but does not demonstrate effort. In extreme cases, when the child’s educational environment does not match his or her ability, parents must advocate strongly for changes in curricula or programming rather than allow children to under-achieve or opt out of “boring” or “slow pace” classes completely.

    Finding meaningfulness in learning. Del Siegle, a leading expert on underachievement of gifted children, emphasizes that “making school more meaningful is among the most promising strategies for reversing academic underachievement.” Even if your child is achieving satisfactorily, making learning more personal and meaningful can only enhance motivation and commitment. How do we do this as parents? One way is to encourage students to pursue their interests outside of school via formal programs or learning on their own at home. Rather than directly teaching your child, parents can assume a supportive role, providing resources, supplies and encouragement, and connecting children to other adults (e.g. career professionals) who can be helpful to them. Parents can request that teachers help students understand why learning something is important and will be helpful to them in the future (e.g. How might I use algebra or geometry in the future? Why is it important to understand world history?). With a little bit of research on their own, parents can help students understand the connection between subjects in school and future careers and professions or how understanding in one subject is necessary as a prerequisite for more advanced study later. 

    Developing appropriate attitudes towards work and ability. We all know that ability and talent has to be combined with a strong work ethic and commitment to study or practice in order for students to be successful in achieving their career and life goals. Carol Dweck, a psychologist, has popularized the idea of mindsets or beliefs about intelligence and ability. According to her, a growth mindset or a belief that ability, including intelligence, can change, grow, and improve with practice and study, is crucial for sustaining a long-term commitment to the development of one’s talents. In contrast, a fixed mindset, or a belief that one is born with a certain amount of ability or intelligence that is fixed and immutable, can hinder performance and achievement even among the most talented individuals. Research by Dweck and others shows that children who hold a growth mindset about their abilities and intelligence will persist through difficult times and rebound from setbacks (e.g. poor grades, not being selected for a program)more readily. How do parents cultivate a growth mindset? According to Dweck, the messages we give children about their performances and grades, specifically the type of praise, can influence their beliefs. Praise that focuses on recognizing and rewarding hard work and feedback that is centered on improvement and growth will promote healthy attitudes towards both ability and effort. (You can read more about how parents can use praise to reinforce a growth mindset in Dweck’s book, Mindset, Ballantine Publishers).

    Working on the Edge of One’s Competency. This is one of Maureen Neihart’s 7 habits of top performers. It refers to being willing to work at something for which success or high achievement is not guaranteed. We all know the importance of challenge in producing growth. Athletes improve their game when they play against better athletes. Musicians improve their technique when they perform with other highly skilled musicians. Students improve their arguments when engaged in discussions with other students who challenge their ideas and assertions. It is not always easy, however, to put yourself into situations that require you to work on the edge of your existing competencies and many students steer clear of these, preferring to stay doing what they are good at and what they are confident they will succeed at.  Neihart suggests that parents help children identify reasonable risks to take in terms of opportunities to grow and improve significantly, help children identify ways to prepare for the challenge, and facilitate reflection on the outcome afterwards. Getting comfortable with risk-taking is critical to enabling a child to reach the highest levels of performance they desire.  


    Duckworth, A, L., Peterson, C., Matthews, M. D., & Kelly, D. R. (2007). Grit: Perseverance and passion for long-term goals. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2007, 92, 1087-1101.

    Duckworth, A. L., Quinn, P. D. & Tsukayama, E. (2012). What No Child Left Behind leaves behind: The roles of IQ and self-control in predicting standardized achievement test scores and report card grades. Journal of Educational Psychology, 104, 439-451.

    Neihart, M. (2008). Peak Performance for Smart Kids. Waco, TX: Prufrock Press.

    Olszewski-Kubilius, P. (2013). Top ten skills to cultivate in your gifted child: Part 1. Parenting for High Potential, 2 (5), 2-3.

    Olszewski-Kubilius, P. (2013). Top ten skills to cultivate in your gifted children: Part 2. Parenting for High Potential, 2 (6), 2-3.

    Siegle, D. (2012). The Underachieving Gifted Child. Prufrock Press.



    Dr. Paula Olszewski-Kubilius, Director of the Center for Talent Development at Northwestern University, suggests ten important skills for parent to cultivate in their children with gifts and talents.  Five of these skills were shared in our July 2020 blog, "Top Ten Skills to Cultivate in Your Gifted Child - Part I." This month, Part II includes 5 more characteristics  that are important for parents who wish to support their gifted children.

    Top Ten Skills to Cultivate in Your Gifted Child - Part II

    Paula Olszewski-Kubilius

    I am often asked by parents what are the most important “things” to do for a gifted  child? Over the years, I have developed this list of characteristics that I have come to believe are some of the most important ones for parents to cultivate so as to help gifted children realize their dreams (notice I said “their dreams” and not their parents’). My list is based on the research literature in the field and my own experience as an administrator of gifted programs and as a parent.

    Grit. This is a concept that Angela Duckworth, a psychologist from the University of Pennsylvania, has developed and promoted. She defines it as “perseverance and passion for long term goals” (p. 1087). Grit involves working assiduously in a talent domain over time, including maintaining effort despite failures, plateaus, and setbacks. Grit may emerge early in a young aspiring musician or artist or develop later as a high school student commits to the study of medicine or political science. How does one develop or cultivate grit? While research has not specifically focused on this, finding one’s passions seems to be key, which takes time and deliberate searching. Parents can help by exposing children to a wide range of fields and topics of study through informal (e.g. trips to museums) and formal learning experiences (e.g. enrichment courses). We do this a lot with young children but it is important to also help older children investigate fields and careers to find their passions. Also, helping students understand that people who make creative contributions to society were “in it for the long haul” and that creative breakthroughs do not come out of the blue without commitment and hard work over extended periods of time, is also crucial. Children can begin to get a picture of this by reading about the lives of eminent individuals and seeing that there were ups and downs, great triumphs and some failures along the way—and that the development of their abilities and talents is a lifelong journey.

    Self-control. This is another characteristic that Duckworth talks about. She defines it as the regulation of behavior, attention and emotion to meet personal goals and standards. Self-control is what enables a student to stay focused on a day-to-day basis on meeting the many smaller goals that are involved in reaching big life goals. Self-control is involved in working consistently to get good grades in a course even if it is not that interesting and choosing to do homework instead of socializing with friends, even though the latter is much more fun. It boils down to a willingness to do what it takes to “get the job done” even if the activity (e.g. practice) is not always that enjoyable. Self-control involves being able to delay immediate gratification so as to remain focused on a larger goal. This is an important skill to model and teach your child. There are many things in life that we all do that are a “means to an end” --- a necessary step on the path towards more autonomous and enjoyable activities. Too many gifted children miss out on challenging and engaging opportunities because they are unwilling to work to get the grades that are needed to qualify or be selected for them. Like it or not, teachers will often choose students who are willing to work hard and make the most out of a special class or opportunity rather than a child who is very bright but does not demonstrate effort. In extreme cases, when the child’s educational environment does not match his or her ability, parents must advocate strongly for changes in curricula or programming rather than allow children to under-achieve or opt out of “boring” or “slow pace” classes completely.

    Finding meaningfulness in learning. Del Siegle, a leading expert on underachievement of gifted children, emphasizes that “making school more meaningful is among the most promising strategies for reversing academic underachievement.” Even if your child is achieving satisfactorily, making learning more personal and meaningful can only enhance motivation and commitment. How do we do this as parents? One way is to encourage students to pursue their interests outside of school via formal programs or learning on their own at home. Rather than directly teaching your child, parents can assume a supportive role, providing resources, supplies and encouragement, and connecting children to other adults (e.g. career professionals) who can be helpful to them. Parents can request that teachers help students understand why learning something is important and will be helpful to them in the future (e.g. How might I use algebra or geometry in the future? Why is it important to understand world history?). With a little bit of research on their own, parents can help students understand the connection between subjects in school and future careers and professions or how understanding in one subject is necessary as a prerequisite for more advanced study later. 

    Developing appropriate attitudes towards work and ability. We all know that ability and talent has to be combined with a strong work ethic and commitment to study or practice in order for students to be successful in achieving their career and life goals. Carol Dweck, a psychologist, has popularized the idea of mindsets or beliefs about intelligence and ability. According to her, a growth mindset or a belief that ability, including intelligence, can change, grow, and improve with practice and study, is crucial for sustaining a long-term commitment to the development of one’s talents. In contrast, a fixed mindset, or a belief that one is born with a certain amount of ability or intelligence that is fixed and immutable, can hinder performance and achievement even among the most talented individuals. Research by Dweck and others shows that children who hold a growth mindset about their abilities and intelligence will persist through difficult times and rebound from setbacks (e.g. poor grades, not being selected for a program)more readily. How do parents cultivate a growth mindset? According to Dweck, the messages we give children about their performances and grades, specifically the type of praise, can influence their beliefs. Praise that focuses on recognizing and rewarding hard work and feedback that is centered on improvement and growth will promote healthy attitudes towards both ability and effort. (You can read more about how parents can use praise to reinforce a growth mindset in Dweck’s book, Mindset, Ballantine Publishers).

    Working on the Edge of One’s Competency. This is one of Maureen Neihart’s 7 habits of top performers. It refers to being willing to work at something for which success or high achievement is not guaranteed. We all know the importance of challenge in producing growth. Athletes improve their game when they play against better athletes. Musicians improve their technique when they perform with other highly skilled musicians. Students improve their arguments when engaged in discussions with other students who challenge their ideas and assertions. It is not always easy, however, to put yourself into situations that require you to work on the edge of your existing competencies and many students steer clear of these, preferring to stay doing what they are good at and what they are confident they will succeed at.  Neihart suggests that parents help children identify reasonable risks to take in terms of opportunities to grow and improve significantly, help children identify ways to prepare for the challenge, and facilitate reflection on the outcome afterwards. Getting comfortable with risk-taking is critical to enabling a child to reach the highest levels of performance they desire.  


    Duckworth, A, L., Peterson, C., Matthews, M. D., & Kelly, D. R. (2007). Grit: Perseverance and passion for long-term goals. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2007, 92, 1087-1101.

    Duckworth, A. L., Quinn, P. D. & Tsukayama, E. (2012). What No Child Left Behind leaves behind: The roles of IQ and self-control in predicting standardized achievement test scores and report card grades. Journal of Educational Psychology, 104, 439-451.

    Neihart, M. (2008). Peak Performance for Smart Kids. Waco, TX: Prufrock Press.

    Olszewski-Kubilius, P. (2013). Top ten skills to cultivate in your gifted child: Part 1. Parenting for High Potential, 2 (5), 2-3.

    Olszewski-Kubilius, P. (2013). Top ten skills to cultivate in your gifted children: Part 2. Parenting for High Potential, 2 (6), 2-3.

    Siegle, D. (2012). The Underachieving Gifted Child. Prufrock Press.

  • 07/27/2020 6:52 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)


    This month, Dr. Paula Olszewski-Kubilius, Director of the Center for Talent Development at Northwestern University, offers insightful perspective for parents who are looking to support and nurture children with advanced learning needs...

    Top Ten Skills to Cultivate in Your Gifted Child - Part 1

    Paula Olszewski-Kubilius

    I am often asked by parents what are the most important “things” to do for a gifted  child? Over the years, I have developed this list of characteristics that I have come to believe are some of the most important ones for parents to cultivate so as to help gifted children realize their dreams (notice I said “their dreams” and not their parents’). My list is based on the research literature in the field and my own experience as an administrator of gifted programs and as a parent.

    Enjoyment of solitude. A consistent finding within the research literature on giftedness is the value of developing the ability to enjoy spending time alone.  Historical accounts of the lives of individuals who make creative contributions to society reveal that often, this alone time was a result of difficult circumstances. But, whether self-imposed or the result of external conditions, this alone time was used productively by individuals – to pursue independent projects, read broadly, write in journals, practice musical instruments, make art, or study. How can parents cultivate enjoyment of solitude in children? It is challenging in current times with Facebook and texting as children can literally always remain connected to friends. Modeling of independent pursuits helps as well as encouragement and facilitation of a quiet place to do their work, study, practice, engage in hobbies, dabble in new interests, or just retreat to for reflective thought. Parents can stress the importance of “down time” to recharge and rejuvenate, set rules or guidelines for phone and internet use during family dinners or events, and show through their actions, how to balance productive use of solitary time with social activities.

    Resiliency. One of the important facts about highly successful individuals is that though they achieved great notoriety for their creative contributions to society, their paths there were not always easy. Many encountered significant challenges in childhood including loss of a parent, instability in their family life, or poverty or racism. Often they found refuge in their talent domain—playing music, writing stories, or reading broadly and voraciously. And, even when they were in their professional careers, their success was not instant or consistent. They typically had significant failures along the way including loss of a job, work that was rejected or panned by critics, or business ventures that did not succeed. Yet, they came back from these failures and persevered. Children need to know that success and failure often go hand and hand. In fact, you often cannot get more of one without more of the other. We want to encourage our children to take risks and to see so called “failures” as opportunities to learn and improve. As parents, we can do that by modeling risk taking and effective coping with set backs and “bumps on the road”. 

    Optimism. Related to resiliency is what psychologist Maureen Neihart refers to a one’s explanatory style—or how individuals explain their success or failure. Neihart says that explanatory style has three dimensions—permanence (whether the cause of an event is viewed as temporary or enduring forever), pervasiveness (projecting causes across many situations), and personalization (whether I or an external event is responsible for the loss or failure). Children who are optimistic are more likely to believe that setbacks or failure are temporary and will persevere because they have hope that things will change for the better—and they can bring about some of that change (e.g. study harder). Optimists also tend to limit the effects of failures rather than blowing them into major catastrophes. In response to a bad grade, an optimist may say that their teacher has high expectations or the test was very hard rather than concluding that all teachers are unfair. As a result, an optimistic child can find a solution and way to improve the outcome rather than dissolving into hopelessness. Neihart says that pessimists blame themselves when things go badly and do not take credit when they work out well. Optimists do the opposite. They take credit for successes and recognize the (at least partial) role of outside factors in disappointing outcomes. The goal is to help children be accountable for their failures and address any areas of weaknesses but without losing confidence to try again. The good news is that optimism can be taught!!! Parents can help children by actively shaping their explanatory style for successes and failures—e.g. teaching them to entertain multiple explanations for a poor performance. 

    Being an Autonomous, Autodidactic Learner. This includes a number of skills such as being able to initiate learning independently, setting individual learning goals and following through on them, identifying what one needs to learn and do in order to complete a project, being able to monitor and evaluate the success of one’s learning, and accessing the appropriate resources needed for learning, including seeking help from knowledgeable others. While the learning that takes place in school is critical to developing the talents of gifted children, much of it is determined and dictated, at least in part, by a teacher, and often is on topics children need to study, but may not particularly engage or interest them. Outside of school is often where passions can be pursued and the ability and desire to learn things that are not required for school, coupled with the motivation to pursue these assiduously, are critical for the development of talent.  Parents can help by modeling autonomous learning, helping children decide on projects and goals, and connecting children to activities that allow them to practice independent learning (e.g. competitions). They might also help by alerting teachers to a child’s significant interests and pursuits outside of school, thereby giving the teacher an opportunity to capitalize on and connect learning at home with learning within school.

    Learning to Deal with Stress and Control Anxiety. Any athlete performing at a national level or performing artists such as dancers, musicians, actors, will tell you that a key to their success is learning to deal with stress and anxiety. It is not that elite performers do not feel stress and anxiety, they practice and develop techniques (e.g. breathing to reduce physical manifestations of stress or anxiety ) and strategies (e.g. over-preparation) to reduce it. Often, they are taught these techniques by coaches, sports psychologists, other performers, mentors and teachers. The performing arts schools, such as music conservatories, and training facilities for elite athletes recognize both the positive and negative aspects of stress on performance and how to capitalize on or mitigate these so as to enable peak performances. In the academic domains, we do very little of this even though scientists, literary scholars, mathematicians, and business entrepreneurs are often similarly involved in competitive (e.g. for grants, contracts, awards) or performance (e.g. presentations) situations. Also, there is stress and anxiety that comes from producing creative work, such as a story, piece of art, original song, a scholarly paper, and having it judged and evaluated by the gatekeepers, journal-reviewers, art critics, book reviewers, in a field. In short, everyone who works at the highest levels of achievement and creativity will encounter and need to learn to deal with stress and anxiety. As parents and teachers, we can begin early to help children with these feelings so that rather than shying away from a challenging course that requires oral presentations, choosing not to run for a school office because it involves making a public speech, or not submitting a story or art piece to a competition, students embrace these as opportunities to learn and view them as stepping stones towards the accomplishment of their goals. (See Neihart’s book cited above for more on this).

    Duckworth, A, L., Peterson, C., Matthews, M. D., & Kelly, D. R. (2007). Grit: Perseverance and passion for long-term goals. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2007, 92, 1087-1101.

    Duckworth, A. L., Quinn, P. D. & Tsukayama, E. (2012). What No Child Left Behind leaves behind: The roles of IQ and self-control in predicting standardized achievement test scores and report card grades. Journal of Educational Psychology, 104, 439-451.

    Neihart, M. (2008). Peak Performance for Smart Kids. Waco, TX: Prufrock Press.

    Olszewski-Kubilius, P. (2013). Top ten skills to cultivate in your gifted child: Part 1. Parenting for High Potential, 2 (5), 2-3.

    Olszewski-Kubilius, P. (2013). Top ten skills to cultivate in your gifted children: Part 2. Parenting for High Potential, 2 (6), 2-3.

    Siegle, D. (2012). The Underachieving Gifted Child. Prufrock Press.

    **********

    Learn about 5 more important skills to cultivate in your gifted child in Part II of Dr. Olszewski-Kubilius's "Top 10 Skills to Cultivate in Your Gifted Child," which will be shared in our August 2020 "Question of the Month" Blog!



  • 06/12/2020 6:58 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    This summer, cancellations of many summer enrichment camps, pool programs, music, and sporting activities, can make finding ways to keep children with advanced learning especially challenging.  

    Nevertheless, creativity often flourishes within constraints, and this summer offers new opportunities for exploration. 

    What interests can your child nurture at home? Inventing a new recipe, writing a poem, making a sketch journal, inventing the "ultimate backyard workout routine," or creating a container garden for the patio or backyard are simple ways that your child may find enjoyment in a summer day. 

    In May, the topic for the Illinois Association for Gifted Children's Monthly  "Virtual Parent Round Table" facilitated by Board Members Pamela Shaw and Denise Kuchta focused on ideas for summer fun and learning. This group inspired a list of Resources for Summer Fun and Enrichment, to which ideas can be added as a "work in progress." Please feel free to take a look! Perhaps you will find yourself enjoying online activities provided by a Chicago museum, exploring a new outdoor activity such as geocaching...

    If you have an additional idea for this list, please email pamshaw@hotmail.com!

    Enjoy the fleeting summer days with your child, and please continue to explore our resources on the parent pages at iagcgifted.org.

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